Easy Cabinet Cards

Cabinet Cards were popular from 1870-1924. They were photographic images mounted on card stock. Measuring roughly 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 inches, these cards adorned parlors. Initially, they were used to display landscapes and were positioned horizontally. The photographer’s studio and information were on the backside. The photographer’s imprint ran across the bottom. Use waned and by 1924, they ceased to exist. Faux cabinet cards are easy to make.

I’ve assembled some using images from Gecko Galz and Graphics Fairy. Links are below.

I selected Halloween themed images that looked like they were created by a photographer during the time cabinet cards were popular. I also selected various photographers’ imprints. I sized the images to 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 inches.

I cut the images using a guillotine. Mine is at least 20 years old. I used a glue stick to adhere both the imprint and the image on a file folder, cut down to size. I chose to use the manila file folder to add bulk. The effect was worth it!

I then used a corner rounder to round the corners uniformly. You don’t need; however, I find my hand is not always steady.

I placed the cards under a heavy book through the night. Once dry, I dry sponged the edges on both sides with Tim Holtz Distress Oxide in Vintage Photo.

This is an easy project. I’ve added the cards to my Halloween vignettes and love the vintage feel. Try making some!

Links:

Gecko Galz: https://www.etsy.com/shop/geckogalz?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=203967362, Jeepers Creepers, The Witches, Costume Party

Graphics Fairy: https://thegraphicsfairy.com/, Premium membership, Mini Ephemera Pieces

Supplies:

Images, Manila File Folders, Paper Cutter, Glue Stick, Corner Rounder, Distress Oxide Vintage Photo, and Sponge Applicator.

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